Kauai is Calling

When my close friend told me her wedding was going to be in Kauai, there wasn’t even a tiny part of me that considered missing it. Don’t get me wrong, she could have had it in a far less tempting location and I would’ve been there, but Kauai at the end of the Minnesota winter is no contest. Most of my preparation for the trip was to plan and train to hike the Kalalau Trail (see Related Post). Before I knew it, my departure date was upon me and I hadn’t even researched what else there was to do on the island. So, I threw the travel guide my friend had given me in my bag and planned to read it on the flight.

RELATED POST: USA: How Not To Die While Hiking the Kalalau Trail

If you’re at all like me and find yourself on your way to Kauai without a clue what to do (other than enjoy the sun and sand), here are a few suggestions.

Getting Around

If you want to explore the island at all, I highly recommend you rent a car. If you really want to explore it, I recommend a four wheel drive vehicle. Here’s why. The beauty of Kauai is in it’s incredibly diverse landscapes. You really want to see the island from every angle.

Uber recently arrived on the island, however there aren’t a lot of drivers working for Uber yet so it’s not guaranteed that you’ll be able to get one. There are taxis available by phone, but with primarily one road that traces the outside of the island traffic can move quite slow so you may be waiting a while. From Lihue Airport to the end of the road at Haena Beach on the North Shore, is 35 miles and it’s about the same going from Lihue Airport to the end of the road in the other direction near Polihale State Park. Those are long and expensive taxi rides and there’s no guarantees you’ll have a way to get back.

Image of the dirt road on the way to Polihale State Park in Kauai.Polihale State Park is at the end of the road on the Southwestern corner of the island where the Na Pali Coast begins. However, the last 3 or so miles of the road to Polihale are unpaved and pretty bumpy. This is where the four wheel drive vehicle would come in handy. I’m pretty comfortable driving in rough conditions, and ended up turning back because I didn’t think my Hyundai sedan was going to make it. I regret not having a more equipped vehicle!

Hiking

The entire Kalalau Trail isn’t for most people (see Related Post). However, the first 2 miles of the trail to Hanakapai’ai Beach can be hiked without a permit. From the beach, you can turn inland for about 1.8 miles to Hanakapai’ai Falls. This is a reasonable but somewhat technical day hike that gives you some exposure to the beautiful Na Pali Coast. Please note that it is not recommended to swim in the beach at Hanakapai’ai due to undercurrents. Expect for the firstImage of stacked rocks on Hanakapi'ai Beach at Mile 2 of the Kalalau Trail. two miles to take about 1 to 2 hours and about the same to go the remainder of the way to the falls.

To get to the trail head, drive to the end of the road on the Northwestern corner of the island and park at either Haena or Ke’e Beaches. See my Related Post for advice on keeping your vehicle safe.

RELATED POST: USA: How Not To Die While Hiking the Kalalau Trail

Must-See Sites

  • Waimea Canyon – I was blown away by Waimea Canyon. I guess I imagined that a canyon on such a small island would be relatively small itself. I couldn’t have been more wrong. The vastness of the canyon, the lush greenery and the waterfalls really make this site otherworldly. We drove the Waimea Canyon Road which has several places to stop and see the canyon from different viewpoints. Make sure your gas tank is full and your camera battery is charged!Image of Waimea Canyon with a waterfall in the distance.
  • Wailua Falls – On a whim on my last day, I decided to visit Wailua Falls, between Kapaa andImage of wild boar crossing the road near Wailua Falls in Kauai. Lihue. The road up to the lookout point beautifully zigs and zags through the countryside  and ends at the falls. If you go past the lookout point there are several parking spots. If you’re lucky like I was, you may even see a wild boar wandering around the lookout point. The falls are over 170 feet tall and, again, much more grand than I imagined. Supposedly, you can hop the concrete barrier and hike down to swim in the pool below the falls but it is not encouraged by the government.Image of Wailua Falls, near Lihue in Kauai.
  • Polihale State Park – Again, I didn’t make it all the way but the draw is the sand dunes and views of the Na Pali Coast. Another time for me, but this was highly recommended by my friends.
  • Spouting Horn Blowhole – Just up the road from Poipu on the South side of the island, you can see the waves at work at this unique blowhole. It is unlike others around Hawaii because it has an additional blowhole that blows only air which causes it to make an eerie gasping sound. We went first thing in the morning when it was quiet so we could hear it!Image of Spouting Horn Blowhole on the Southern part of Kauai, near Poipu.

Food

So, I don’t think you can really go wrong on the island with your food choicImage of Hanalei Dolphin Fish Market, near Poipu, where we got the most delicious Poke Bowl.es, however there are a couple of highlights. First, if you’re near Poipu, I highly recommend getting a Poke bowl from the Hanalei Dolphin Fish Market. Not only was it delicious but the fish is fresh and the food was prepared with care. Now, if you wanna compliment your Poke bowl with, say, a beer, I would recommend the Hanalei IPA by Kona Brewing Company. All I’ll say is that it has hints of passionfruit! #mindblown

I know that we didn’t have time to even scratch the surface of what Kauai has to offer, but what we did see sold me on going back again in the future.

Mahalo, my friends!

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